In Chinese, names of Tai Chi moves are generally written in a poetic form, and they have very specific and symbolic meaning,

it is difficult to translate those names into English without loosing some accuracy of their original meaning, therefore, those

name lists in English are merely to provide an rough idea of what they mean in Chinese, if you would like to learn more about the meaning of those names, you should seek explanations from teachers/instructors you are training with.

 

Following lists are free to all as a learning resource. It should not be used by anyone in any form as means of obtaining financial benefit. If you have any questions concerning those name lists, please feel free to contact us.

 

You need Adobe Reader to access those files, if it is not installed on your computer, you can download it free from Adobe

Tai Chi in 24 Forms

Primarily based on traditional Yang Style, Tai Chi in 24 Forms was compiled in the 50s

by Chinese Sports Council to encourage wider population to take up Tai Chi as general

health keeping exercise, today it has become one of the most popular styles practiced

by the millions all over the world.

Chinese

English

Tai Chi in 24 Forms

Specially compiled list for use with the Wall Chart showing the name of each form and

its co-responding pictures on the Wall Chart. It is an ideal reference for self-learning or

use with an appropriated course.

Chinese

English

Chen Style Tai Chi First Routine

Also known as Chen Style Taijiquan New Frame First Routine. This version refers to the

routine taught/passed down by grand-master Chen Zhaokui (1928-1981).

Chinese

English

Chen Style Tai Chi Second Routine (Cannon Fist)

Also known as Chen Style Taijiquan New Frame Second Routine. This version refers to

the routine taught/passed down by grandmaster Chen Zhaokui (1928-1981).

Chinese

English

Yang Style Tai Chi

A very popular traditional Tai Chi styles, it's best known in the West as Yang Style

Long Form. The version here refers to the routine in the Tai Chi Manual written by

grandmaster Yang Chengfu (1883-1936). The Manual was first published in 1931.

Chinese

English